corroboration

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English corroboracioun, borrowed from Late Latin corrōborātiō (strengthening).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corroboration (countable and uncountable, plural corroborations)

  1. The act of corroborating, strengthening, or confirming; addition of strength; confirmation
    • 1857, Herman Melville, The Confidence-Man, Chapter 23:
      Fallacious enough doctrine when wielded against one's prejudices, but in corroboration of cherished suspicions not without likelihood.
    • September 16 2016, Jonah Goldberg writing in the Baltimore Sun, Hillary's health is a valid issue:
      Social media lighted up with corroborations that lower Manhattan was the meteorological equivalent of the jungles of Borneo.
  2. That which corroborates.
    • 2018, James Lambert, “A multitude of ‘lishes’: The nomenclature of hybridity”, in English World-Wide[1], page 2:
      Urban Dictionary records at least 66 of the terms found by the present research, but as this dictionary liberally accepts words, definitions, and sample sentences based solely on the say-so of contributors, in the absence of corroboration from other sources the authenticity of some entries must remain dubious.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

corroboration f (plural corroborations)

  1. corroboration, verification, confirmation

Further readingEdit