confirm

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French confermer, from Latin confirmāre (to make firm, strenghten, establish), from com- (together) + firmare (to make firm), from firmus (firm).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

confirm (third-person singular simple present confirms, present participle confirming, simple past and past participle confirmed)

  1. To strengthen; to make firm or resolute.
  2. (transitive, Christianity) To administer the sacrament of confirmation on (someone).
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, p. 35:
      Elizabeth, daughter of Henry VIII, was baptized and confirmed at the age of three days.
  3. To assure the accuracy of previous statements.
    • 2019 March 18, Steven Pifer, Five years after Crimea’s illegal annexation, the issue is no closer to resolution[1], The Center for International Security and Cooperation:
      The little green men were clearly professional soldiers by their bearing, carried Russian weapons, and wore Russian combat fatigues, but they had no identifying insignia. Vladimir Putin originally denied they were Russian soldiers; that April, he confirmed they were.

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TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

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