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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, borrowed from Old French coverture, from covrir (to cover) or from Late Latin coopertura. Doublet of couverture.

NounEdit

coverture (countable and uncountable, plural covertures)

  1. (law, historical) A common law doctrine developed in England during the Middle Ages, whereby a woman's legal existence, upon marriage, was subsumed by that of her husband, particularly with regard to ownership of property and protection.
  2. Alternative spelling of couverture
  3. Shelter, hiding place.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act 3 Scene 1
      URSULA. The pleasant'st angling is to see the fish
      Cut with her golden oars the silver stream,
      And greedily devour the treacherous bait:
      So angle we for Beatrice; who even now
      Is couched in the woodbine coverture.

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin coopertūra, from Latin coopertus; equivalent to covert +‎ -ure, from covrir (to cover).

NounEdit

coverture f (oblique plural covertures, nominative singular coverture, nominative plural covertures)

  1. covering; cover

DescendantsEdit