See also: crêper

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of uncertain origin[1]; proposed derivations include:

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

creper (feminine crepera, neuter creperum); first/second-declension adjective (nominative masculine singular in -er)

  1. dusky, dark
  2. uncertain, doubtful, obscure

DeclensionEdit

First/second-declension adjective (nominative masculine singular in -er).

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative creper crepera creperum creperī creperae crepera
Genitive creperī creperae creperī creperōrum creperārum creperōrum
Dative creperō creperō creperīs
Accusative creperum creperam creperum creperōs creperās crepera
Ablative creperō creperā creperō creperīs
Vocative creper crepera creperum creperī creperae crepera

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • creper in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • creper in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  1. ^ Walde, Alois; Hofmann, Johann Baptist (1938) , “creper”, in Lateinisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 1, 3rd edition, Heidelberg: Carl Winter, page 289

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From crepen +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

creper (plural crepers) (rare)

  1. A creeper or slitherer.
  2. A device for securing ships; a small anchor.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: creeper
  • Scots: creeper

ReferencesEdit