decedent

See also: décèdent

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin decedens, present active participle of decedere (to depart, die).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈsiːdənt/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /dɪˈsi.dənt/

NounEdit

decedent (plural decedents)

  1. (law, chiefly US) A dead person.
    • 2009 December 22, New York Post, “‘Dangerous drug mix’ likely killed Brittany”, in The Herald Sun[1]:
      “A check of the nightstands revealed large amounts of prescription medication in the decedent’s name,” the coroner’s notes said, according to TMZ.com.
    • 2023, Sara Miller Llana, Whitney Eulich, Dominique Soguel, As assisted dying broadens, countries wrestle with new ethical lines, in: The Christian Science Monitor, January 10 2023
      A 2020 study found that MAiD recipients in Ontario tended to be wealthier, less likely to be in institutional care, and more likely to be married than the average Ontario decedent.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

decedent (not comparable)

  1. Removing; departing; deceased.
    • 1846, Pennsylvania Law Journal, volume 5:
      satisfy every claimant upon the estate of a decedent person

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

dēcēdent

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of dēcēdō