decrucifier

See also: décrucifier

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

de- +‎ crucifier

NounEdit

decrucifier (plural decrucifiers)

  1. (rare) Someone or something that decrucifies.
    Nobody knows the name of the Christ's decrucifier because it wasn't so important.
    • 1963, Conor Cruise O'Brien, Maria Cross: Imaginative Patterns in a Group of Modern Christian Writers, Academy Guild Press (1963), page 231:
      The crucifixion of the Princess in Tête d'or is, ostensibly, a revenge, not for an emotional but for a social wrong, yet it is clear, I think, that a substitution has taken place. In the Princess's own wish - and we are in the land of wishes - her decrucifier, Tête d'Or, was also her crucifier: []
    • 1988, "Cal On Christmas", Felix (Imperial College London), Issue 821, 14 December 1988, page 30:
      Ronco only exist for one month a year, in which time they sell all their 'useful' items such as 'Map-o-Meter' or 'Handy Finger Nail Counter', next year I am reliably informed they are bringing out a Christ decrucifier.
    • 2005, Sean Murphy, The Time of New Weather, Dell (2008), ISBN 978-0553586794, pages 4-5:
      There were many new religions and social movements. The One O'Clockers believed that although they couldn't know the date the Second Coming was to occur, they did know the time. The DeCrucifiers, inspired by many sightings of Christ caused by rifts in the fabric of history, were determined to find him on the cross before he died and rescue him.
Last modified on 20 September 2013, at 17:25