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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French descension, from Latin descensio, descensionem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

descension (countable and uncountable, plural descensions)

  1. (now rare) Descent; the act of descending. [from 15th c.]
    Death is followed by either ascension into a higher plane or descension into a lower plane.
    • 1597, William Shakespeare, Henry IV part I, II.5:
      From a God to a Bull? a heavy descension. It was Jove's case.
  2. (astronomy, obsolete) The descent below the horizon of a celestial body. [16th-19th c.]
    • 1646, Sir Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, VI.3:
      For in regard of time (as we elsewhere declare) the stars do vary their longitudes, and consequently the times of their ascension and descension.

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin descensio, descensionem.

NounEdit

descension f (oblique plural descensions, nominative singular descension, nominative plural descensions)

  1. descent

AntonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit