durative

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed, ultimately from Old French duratif (lasting continuously (for a certain time)), via Anglo-Norman French, and existing in the form duratif from about the twelfth through the fourteenth centuries, when the spelling was altered to durative under the influence of the literary Neolatin movement. Analogous to dure (to last, to continue) +‎ -ive.

AdjectiveEdit

durative

  1. Of or pertaining to duration.
  2. Long-lasting.
  3. (linguistics) Of or pertaining to the aspect of a verb that expresses continuing action; continuative. Part of the imperfective aspect, as opposed to the perfective aspect, of verbs.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

durative (plural duratives)

  1. (linguistics) This aspect, or a verb in this aspect; a continuative.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

durative

  1. feminine singular of duratif

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

durative

  1. feminine plural of durativo