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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English verbe, from Old French verbe, from Latin verbum (word, verb), from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo-. Doublet of word.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

verb (plural verbs)

  1. (grammar) A word that indicates an action, event, or state.
    The word “speak” is an English verb.
  2. (obsolete) Any word; a vocable.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of South to this entry?)
  3. (figuratively) An action as opposed to a trait or thing.
    Kindness is a verb, not an adjective. You're only kind if you do kind things.
  4. (programming) A named command that performs a specific operation on an object.
    • 1995, Adam Denning, OLE Controls Inside Out (page 321)
      You can invoke the Properties OLE verb in many ways. The easiest way is to move the mouse over the border of the control until it becomes only a four-way pointer and then right-click.
    • 2016, Ada Gavrilovska, Attaining High Performance Communications: A Vertical Approach
      The InfiniBand verbs, which are closely modeled in the “Gen2” interface, provide the functional specification for the operations that should be allowed on an InfiniBand compliant adapter.

Usage notesEdit

Verbs compose a fundamental category of words in most languages. In an English clause, a verb forms the head of the predicate of the clause. In many languages, verbs uniquely conjugate for tense and aspect.

QuotationsEdit

  • 2001Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl, p 221
    Then you could say that the doorway exploded. But the particular verb doesn't do the action justice. Rather, it shattered into infinitesimal pieces.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • See also: Thesaurus:verb
  • TranslationsEdit

    VerbEdit

    verb (third-person singular simple present verbs, present participle verbing, simple past and past participle verbed)

    1. (transitive, nonstandard, colloquial) To use any word that is not, or had not been a verb (especially a noun) as if it were a verb.
      • a. 1981 Feb 22, unknown Guardian editor as quoted by William Safire, On Language, in New York Times, pSM3
        Haig, in congressional hearings before his confirmatory, paradoxed his auditioners by abnormalling his responds so that verbs were nouned, nouns verbed and adjectives adverbised. He techniqued a new way to vocabulary his thoughts so as to informationally uncertain anybody listening about what he had actually implicationed... .
      • 1997, David. F. Griffiths, Desmond J. Higham, learning LATEX, p8
        Nouns should never be verbed.
      • 2005 Oct 5, Jeffrey Mattison, Letters, in The Christian Science Monitor, p8
        In English, verbing nouns is okay
    2. (used as a neutral, unspecific verb, often in linguistics and the social sciences) To perform any action that is normally expressed by a verb.
      • 1946: Rand Corporation, The Rand Paper Series
        For example, one-part versions of the proposition "The doctor pursued the lawyer" were "The doctor verbed the object," ...
      • 1964: Journal of Mathematical Psychology
        Each sentence had the same basic structure: The subject transitive verbed the object who intransitive verbed in the location.
      • 1998: Marilyn A. Walker, Aravind Krishna Joshi, Centering Theory in Discourse
        The sentence frame was Dan verbed Ben approaching the store. This sentence frame was followed in all cases by He went inside.

    ConjugationEdit

    QuotationsEdit

    See alsoEdit

    AnagramsEdit


    CatalanEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From Latin verbum.

    NounEdit

    verb m (plural verbs)

    1. verb

    Norwegian BokmålEdit

     
    Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia no

    EtymologyEdit

    From Latin verbum.

    NounEdit

    verb n (definite singular verbet, indefinite plural verb or verber, definite plural verba or verbene)

    1. (grammar) verb

    Derived termsEdit

    ReferencesEdit


    Norwegian NynorskEdit

     
    Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia nn

    EtymologyEdit

    From Latin verbum.

    NounEdit

    verb n (definite singular verbet, indefinite plural verb, definite plural verba)

    1. (grammar) verb

    Derived termsEdit

    ReferencesEdit


    RomanianEdit

     
    Romanian Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia ro

    EtymologyEdit

    From Latin verbum.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    verb n (plural verbe)

    1. verb

    DeclensionEdit


    SwedishEdit

    NounEdit

    verb n

    1. (grammar) verb

    DeclensionEdit

    Declension of verb 
    Singular Plural
    Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
    Nominative verb verbet verb verben
    Genitive verbs verbets verbs verbens

    SynonymsEdit

    HyponymsEdit

    Related termsEdit

    ReferencesEdit


    VepsEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    (This etymology is missing. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

    NounEdit

    verb

    1. verb

    InflectionEdit

    Inflection of verb
    nominative sing. verb
    genitive sing. verban
    partitive sing. verbad
    partitive plur. verboid
    singular plural
    nominative verb verbad
    accusative verban verbad
    genitive verban verboiden
    partitive verbad verboid
    essive-instructive verban verboin
    translative verbaks verboikš
    inessive verbas verboiš
    elative verbaspäi verboišpäi
    illative ? verboihe
    adessive verbal verboil
    ablative verbalpäi verboilpäi
    allative verbale verboile
    abessive verbata verboita
    comitative verbanke verboidenke
    prolative verbadme verboidme
    approximative I verbanno verboidenno
    approximative II verbannoks verboidennoks
    egressive verbannopäi verboidennopäi
    terminative I ? verboihesai
    terminative II verbalesai verboilesai
    terminative III verbassai
    additive I ? verboihepäi
    additive II verbalepäi verboilepäi

    ReferencesEdit

    • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007), “глагол”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika