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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Derived from exiguous.

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

exiguity (usually uncountable, plural exiguities)

  1. The quality of being meagre or scanty.
    • 1986, M. J. Vilares, Structural Change in Macroeconomic Models: Theory and Estimation[1], page 59:
      We have yet to treat the exiguity of the accounting framework and this exiguity draws away the interest to any empirical utilisation.
    • 1991, Robert N. Swanson, Standard of Livings: Parochial Revenues in Pre-Reformation England, Christopher Harper-Bill (editor), Religious Belief and Ecclesiastical Careers in Late Medieval England: Proceedings of the Conference Held at Strawberry Hill, Easter, 1989, page 176,
      However, despite its exiguity, the vicarage did maintain an independent existence as a benefice, and the College continued to make presentations to the bishop of Worcester.
    • 2002, Martin Bruegel, Farm, Shop, Landing: The Rise of a Market Society in the Hudson Valley, 1780—1860[2], page 21:
      They were one means by which to rise above exiguities and weather the turbulences in a precarious world.

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