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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Derived from exiguous.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛɡzɪˈɡjuːɪti/

NounEdit

exiguity (usually uncountable, plural exiguities)

  1. The quality of being meagre or scanty.
    • 1658, Thomas Browne, “The Garden of Cyrus. Or, The Quincunciall, Lozenge, or Net-work Plantations of the Ancients, Artificially, Naturally, Mystically Considered. Chapter III.”, in Hydriotaphia, Urne-buriall, or, A Discourse of the Sepulchrall Urnes Lately Found in Norfolk. Together with The Garden of Cyrus, or The Quincunciall, Lozenge, or Net-work Plantations of the Ancients, Artificially, Naturally, Mystically Considered. With Sundry Observations, London: Printed for Hen[ry] Brome at the Signe of the Gun in Ivy-lane, OCLC 48702491; reprinted as Hydriotaphia (The English Replicas), New York, N.Y.: Payson & Clarke Ltd., 1927, OCLC 78413388, page 136:
      The exiguity and ſmallneſſe of ſome ſeeds extending to large productions is one of the magnalities of nature, ſomewhat illuſtrating the work of the Creation, and vaſt production from nothing.
    • 1986, M. J. Vilares, Structural Change in Macroeconomic Models: Theory and Estimation[1], page 59:
      We have yet to treat the exiguity of the accounting framework and this exiguity draws away the interest to any empirical utilisation.
    • 1991, Robert N. Swanson, Standard of Livings: Parochial Revenues in Pre-Reformation England, Christopher Harper-Bill (editor), Religious Belief and Ecclesiastical Careers in Late Medieval England: Proceedings of the Conference Held at Strawberry Hill, Easter, 1989, page 176,
      However, despite its exiguity, the vicarage did maintain an independent existence as a benefice, and the College continued to make presentations to the bishop of Worcester.
    • 2002, Martin Bruegel, Farm, Shop, Landing: The Rise of a Market Society in the Hudson Valley, 1780—1860[2], page 21:
      They were one means by which to rise above exiguities and weather the turbulences in a precarious world.

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