exiguity

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Derived from exiguous.

PronunciationEdit

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with enPR or the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

exiguity ‎(usually uncountable, plural exiguities)

  1. The quality of being meagre or scanty.
    • 1986, M. J. Vilares, Structural Change in Macroeconomic Models: Theory and Estimation, page 59,
      We have yet to treat the exiguity of the accounting framework and this exiguity draws away the interest to any empirical utilisation.
    • 1991, Robert N. Swanson, Standard of Livings: Parochial Revenues in Pre-Reformation England, Christopher Harper-Bill (editor), Religious Belief and Ecclesiastical Careers in Late Medieval England: Proceedings of the Conference Held at Strawberry Hill, Easter, 1989, page 176,
      However, despite its exiguity, the vicarage did maintain an independent existence as a benefice, and the College continued to make presentations to the bishop of Worcester.
    • 2002, Martin Bruegel, Farm, Shop, Landing: The Rise of a Market Society in the Hudson Valley, 1780—1860, page 21,
      They were one means by which to rise above exiguities and weather the turbulences in a precarious world.

TranslationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

Read in another language