formuinethar

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From for- +‎ muinethar.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

for·muinethar ‎(verbal noun format)

  1. to envy
    • c. 8th or 9th century, Codex Laurentinus, Plut. XLV, Cod. 14, s. X, folio 6b, glossing Virgil's Eclogues 3:103:
      far·muinethar glosses fascinat ‎(envies)
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 19d27, (glossing aemulantur vobis at Galatians 4:17)
      nob·éttigetar .i. seodoapostoli .i. fordob·moinetar, ní ar bar seirc
      they are jealous of you i.e. the pseudo-apostles i.e. they envy you, it is not for love of you
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 17b16
      a for·ménatar
      when they envied

ConjugationEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
for·muinethar
also for·mmuinethar
for·muinethar
pronounced with /-ṽ(ʲ)-/
for·muinethar
also for·mmuinethar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • for·moinethar” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.