EnglishEdit

NounEdit

galiot (plural galiots)

  1. Alternative spelling of galliot
    • 1998, James Neal Primm, Lion of the Valley: St. Louis, Missouri, 1764-1980, page 67,
      By 1795 five large galleys, each with sails and thirty-two or thirty-four oars, one large and two small cannons, and eight swivel guns; four galiots, each with eight swivel guns; and a gunboat with one cannon were available for duty above New Orleans.
    • 2011, James R. Gibson, Feeding the Russian Fur Trade, page 103,
      Most of the state cargo vessels were outfitted as brigs (two-masted, square-rigged ships carrying 150 to 300 tons) and galiots (two-masted, oblique-rigged ships carrying up to 100 tons).
    • 2011, David S. T. Blackmore, Warfare on the Mediterranean in the Age of Sail: A History, 1571-1866, page 57,
      His opponent Ali Monizindade2 emerged to meet the Christian fleet with about 240 galleys and 65 galiots. Most of the galleys and, of course, all the galiots were smaller and lighter than the Holy League ships.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From galea or Italian galeotto.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

galiot m (plural galiots)

  1. (historical) galley slave
    • 2002, Albert Sánchez Piñol, chapter 8, in La pell freda, La Campana, →ISBN:
      Calli la fumuda boca, deia en Batís, remant al meu costat com un galiot.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. (archaic) galliot

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

galiot m (plural galiots)

  1. pirate

Derived termsEdit