English

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Verb

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gnawn

  1. (archaic) past participle of gnaw
    • c. 1597 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Merry Wiues of Windsor”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act II, scene ii], page 47:
      ſee the hell of hauing a false woman : my bed ſhall be abus'd, my Coffers ranſack'd, my reputation gnawne at, and I ſhall only receiue this villanous wrong, but ſtand vnder the adoption of abhominable termes []

Synonyms

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Welsh

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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gnawn

  1. inflection of gwneud:
    1. first-person plural future colloquial
    2. first-person singular conditional colloquial

Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gnawn nawn ngnawn unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.