English edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle English radical, from Latin rādīcālis (of or pertaining to the root, having roots, radical).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

radical (comparative more radical, superlative most radical)

  1. Favoring fundamental change, or change at the root cause of a matter.
    His beliefs are radical.
  2. (botany, not comparable) Pertaining to a root (of a plant).
  3. Pertaining to the basic or intrinsic nature of something.
    Synonym: fundamental
    Antonyms: ignorable, trivial
  4. Thoroughgoing; far-reaching.
    The spread of the cancer required radical surgery, and the entire organ was removed.
    • 2012 January, Donald Worster, “A Drier and Hotter Future”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 1, archived from the original on 26 January 2012, page 70:
      Phoenix and Lubbock are both caught in severe drought, and it is going to get much worse. We may see many such [dust] storms in the decades ahead, along with species extinctions, radical disturbance of ecosystems, and intensified social conflict over land and water. Welcome to the Anthropocene, the epoch when humans have become a major geological and climatic force.
  5. (lexicography, not comparable) Of or pertaining to the root of a word.
  6. (phonology, phonetics, not comparable, of a sound) Produced using the root of the tongue.
    Coordinate terms: coronal, dorsal, labial, laryngeal
  7. (chemistry, not comparable) Involving free radicals.
  8. (mathematics) Relating to a radix or mathematical root.
    a radical quantity; a radical sign
  9. (slang, 1980s & 1990s) Excellent; awesome.
    That was a radical jump!

Synonyms edit

  • (linguistics, in reference to words): primitive

Antonyms edit

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Related terms edit

Translations edit

Noun edit

radical (plural radicals)

  1. (historical, 19th-century Britain, politics) A member of the most progressive wing of the Liberal Party; someone favouring social reform (but generally stopping short of socialism).
  2. (historical, early 20th-century France) A member of an influential, centrist political party favouring moderate social reform, a republican constitution, and secular politics.
  3. A person with radical opinions.
  4. (arithmetic) A root (of a number or quantity).
  5. (linguistics) In logographic writing systems such as the Chinese writing system, the portion of a character (if any) that provides an indication of its meaning, as opposed to phonetic.
    • 2022, R. F. Kuang, Babel, HarperVoyager, page 9:
      The boy recognised the Chinese characters, though the calligraphy looked a bit strange, as if drawn by someone who had seen them and copied them out radical by radical without knowing what they meant.
  6. (linguistics) In Celtic languages, refers to the basic, underlying form of an initial consonant which can be further mutated under the Celtic initial consonant mutations.
  7. (linguistics) In Semitic languages, any one of the set of consonants (typically three) that make up a root.
  8. (chemistry) A group of atoms, joined by covalent bonds, that take part in reactions as a single unit.
  9. (organic chemistry) A free radical.
  10. (algebra, commutative algebra, ring theory, of an ideal) Given an ideal I in a commutative ring R, another ideal, denoted Rad(I) or  , such that an element xR is in Rad(I) if, for some positive integer n, xnI; equivalently, the intersection of all prime ideals containing I.
  11. (algebra, ring theory, of a ring) Given a ring R, an ideal containing elements of R that share a property considered, in some sense, "not good".
  12. (algebra, ring theory, of a module) The intersection of maximal submodules of a given module.
  13. (number theory) The product of the distinct prime factors of a given positive integer.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

radical m or f (masculine and feminine plural radicals)

  1. radical

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

radical m or f by sense (plural radicals)

  1. radical

Further reading edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Late Latin rādīcālis.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

radical (feminine radicale, masculine plural radicaux, feminine plural radicales)

  1. radical
    L’idéologie islamiste radicale de Boko Haram a provoqué le déplacement de plus de deux millions de personnes dans le nord du Nigeria.
    The radical Islamist ideology of Boko Haram caused more than two million persons to be displaced in northern Nigeria.

Noun edit

radical m (plural radicaux)

  1. (linguistics, grammar) radical, root

Further reading edit

Galician edit

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun edit

radical m (plural radicais)

  1. radical (in various senses)

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

 
 
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ʁɐ.diˈkal/ [ʁɐ.ðiˈkaɫ]
    • (Southern Portugal) IPA(key): /ʁɐ.diˈka.li/ [ʁɐ.ðiˈka.li]

  • Rhymes: -al, -aw
  • Hyphenation: ra‧di‧cal

Noun edit

radical m (plural radicais)

  1. (linguistic morphology) root (primary lexical unit of a word)
    Synonym: raiz

Noun edit

radical m or f by sense (plural radicais)

  1. radical (person holding unorthodox views)
    Synonym: extremista

Adjective edit

radical m or f (plural radicais)

  1. radical (favouring fundamental change)
  2. drastic; extreme
  3. (Brazil, slang) excellent; awesome; thrilling
  4. (sports) extreme (dangerous)

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French radical or German Radikal.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

radical m or n (feminine singular radicală, masculine plural radicali, feminine and neuter plural radicale)

  1. radical

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin rādīcālis.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /radiˈkal/ [ra.ð̞iˈkal]
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Syllabification: ra‧di‧cal

Adjective edit

radical m or f (masculine and feminine plural radicales)

  1. radical, seismic

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

radical m (plural radicales)

  1. radical

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit