English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From hare +‎ -ling.

Noun edit

hareling (plural harelings)

  1. (rare) A young or diminutive hare.
    • 1886, Edward Hugessen Knatchbull-Hugessen Baron Brabourne, Friends and Foes from Fairy Land, page 352:
      I'm coming, I'm coming, the nice old stoat, who is so fond of tender harelings.
    • 1978, Leea Virtanen, Children's Lore, page 67:
      In central Finland first-year children are greeted with "Hello, big-eyed, long eared harelings", using a dialect word for a young hare born in August, []
    • 2002, Tom Clark, Edward Dorn: A World of Difference, page 327:
      The family's proliferating rabbit population was memorialized in The Hareling, a children's book done as a cottage project, with Ed producing the text - about a newborn rabbit found in the fields — to accompany Helene's drawings.
    • 2014, Nick Groom, The Seasons:
      The hare, the hare-kin,
      Old Big-bum, Old Bouchart,
      The hare-ling, the frisky one, []