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See also: ling, líng, lìng, līng, and lǐng

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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English -ling, from Old English -ling, from Proto-Germanic *-lingaz, a nominal suffix, probably composed of Proto-Germanic *-ilaz (agent/instrumental/diminutive suffix) + Proto-Germanic *-ingaz (patronymic suffix). Akin to Dutch -ling, German -ling, Icelandic -lingur, Gothic -𐌻𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (-liggs) (in 𐌲𐌰𐌳𐌹𐌻𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (gadiliggs)). More at -le, -ing.

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-ling

  1. A suffix forming diminutives with the meanings of:
    1. a small, immature, or miniature version of what is denoted by the main stem.
    2. a follower or resident of what is denoted by the original root or stem.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Usage notesEdit

Words ending in -ing derived from a root or stem terminating in -l or -le, such as dazzling, have usually only an accidental resemblance, although sometimes there is a connection, as in sidling, which derives from Middle English in this form, and which is also a present participle form of the modern English verb to sidle, which in itself is a back-formation from sidling.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English -ling, from Old English -ling, -linga, -lunga (adverbial suffix). Compare -long.

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-ling

  1. An adverbial suffix denoting manner, direction or position.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a rebracketing of nouns with an -ing suffix. See above (English).

SuffixEdit

-ling m

  1. A suffix that describes a person (or other creature) in terms of a place of origin or a quality, as defined by the root to which it is added.

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German -ling, from Proto-Germanic *-ilingaz.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ling m (genitive -linges or -lings, plural -linge)

  1. A diminutive modifier of nouns having the physical sense of a younger, smaller or inferior version of what is denoted by the original noun.
  2. Indicates possession of or connection with a quality or property, such as Schwächling from schwach (weakling) or Frühling from früh (the season [Spring] which comes early).
  3. A diminutive modifier of nouns, meaning a follower or resident of what is denoted by the stem form.

Derived termsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From alteration of suffixal use of Old English lang (long)

SuffixEdit

-ling

  1. adverbial suffix denoting direction, state or position
    hinderling (backwards)

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *-ilingaz

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-ling

  1. suffix used in forming personal nouns
    dēorling "favorite, darling"
    rǣpling "prisoner, captive, criminal"
  2. suffix forming diminutives
    stærlinc "starling"
  3. dynasty, lineage
    Icling ("dynasty of Icel" or "House of Icel"); Ætheling (House of Ethel)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit