See also: Hirn

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hirne, herne, from Old English hyrne (horn, corner, angle), from Proto-West Germanic *hurnijā, from Proto-Germanic *hurnijǭ (horn, corner, angle), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂-. Proto-Germanic *hurnijǭ is a diminutive form of *hurną, from which comes English horn.

Cognate with Old Frisian herne (horn, corner, angle), Old Norse hyrna (corner), Norwegian Bokmål hjørne (corner) (Bokmål), Norwegian Nynorsk hyrna (corner) (Nynorsk), Icelandic hyrna (point of an axehead, mountain peak). More at horn.

NounEdit

hirn (plural hirns)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Corner; nook; hiding-place

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

hirn

  1. Alternative form of herne (corner)

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English herne, hirne, from Old English hyrne (horn, corner, angle), from Proto-West Germanic *hurnijā, from Proto-Germanic *hurnijǭ (horn, corner, angle), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂- (horn).

Cognate with Old Frisian herne (horn, corner, angle), Norwegian hyrna (corner), Icelandic hyrna (point of an axehead, mountain peak). More at horn.

NounEdit

hirn (plural hirns)

  1. corner; nook
    To ilka hirn he takes his rout / And gangs just stavering about / In quest o'prey. — C. Keith.
  2. a hiding-place

Usage notesEdit

  • Usually plural

Derived termsEdit