EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌɡə(ɹ)

Etymology 1Edit

Composed in English of lug +‎ -er. Attested since the early 17th century.[1]

NounEdit

lugger (plural luggers)

  1. That which lugs in either literal or figurative senses.
    • 2015, Garry Allison, Southern Hoofprints[2], page 450:
      The horse was a lugger – lugging into the rail all the time. I had to fight hard to keep him running straight
  2. One who lugs, especially one whose job entails pulling or moving heavy objects.
    • 1999, Ontario labor relations board, Labour Relations Board Reports, page 693:
      Robert Taillon, a lugger at Rapid, testified that in December 1997, Carlos Diaz and Michel Labrosse began to train Rene Delage as a lugger for the large transformers.
  3. (slang, Australia, US) A conman. [from 20th century][2]
  4. A person hired by a gambling establishment to locate potential customers and bring them in.
    Synonyms: picker-up, roper, runner, steerer
    • 2008, Ed Taggert, When the Rackets Reigned (page 187)
      An estimated 50 luggers were employed to bring gamblers to Reading.

Etymology 2Edit

Likely from lugsail,[3], but compare also Middle Dutch luggen (to fish with a dragnet).[4]

NounEdit

lugger (plural luggers)

  1. A small vessel having two or three masts, and a running bowsprit, and carrying lugsails.
    • 1899, Kate Chopin, The Awakening:
      A good many persons of the pension had gone over to the Cheniere Caminada in Beaudelet's lugger to hear mass.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Variant of laggar falcon, from Hindi लग्गर (laggar).

NounEdit

lugger (plural luggers)

  1. An Indian falcon (Falco jugger), similar to the European lanner and the American prairie falcon.
    • 2013, Conor Mark Jameson, Silent Spring Revisted[3], page 11:
      Falconry is a difficult art to master, some species more so than others. Sakers and Luggers are known to be problematic, and easy to lose, or to lose patience with.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ lugger, n.1, in Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.
  2. ^ Jonathon Green (2019) , “lugger, n.3”, in Green's Dictionary of Slang[1]
  3. ^ lugger” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.
  4. ^ lugger, n.2, in Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

lugger c (singular definite luggeren, plural indefinite luggere)

 
A schematic lugger
  1. lugger

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English lugger

NounEdit

lugger m (definite singular luggeren, indefinite plural luggere, definite plural luggerne)

  1. (nautical) a lugger

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English lugger

NounEdit

lugger m (definite singular luggeren, indefinite plural luggerar, definite plural luggerane)

  1. (nautical) a lugger

ReferencesEdit