paleoconservative

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From paleo- +‎ conservative, by analogy with neoconservative.

NounEdit

paleoconservative ‎(plural paleoconservatives)

  1. (US, politics) A political conservative who espouses paleoconservatism, embracing states' rights and social structures perceived to be traditional
    • 1979, February 13[Esquire], The Neocons:
      In fact, the neoconservative Moynihan running in New York against the paleoconservative James Buckley was able to position himself as the proper heir to a New Deal liberal tradition that Moynihan had been vigorously criticizing for almost a decade.
    • 1992, Robert Hughes, “The Fraying of America”[1], Time:
      If they are fraying now, it is at least in part due to the prevalence of demagogues who wish to claim that there is only one path to virtuous American-ness: paleoconservatives like Jesse Helms and Pat Robertson who think this country has one single ethic, [] .
    • 1999, Joseph Scotchie, The Paleoconservatives, page 11:
      As noted earlier, immigration was the issue that sent the open border Right on a search-and-destroy mission against paleoconservatives.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

paleoconservative ‎(comparative more paleoconservative, superlative most paleoconservative)

  1. (US, politics) Holding views associated with paleoconservatism, including opposition to the federal government and social change

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