See also: Paulin

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortening of tarpaulin.

NounEdit

paulin ‎(plural paulins)

  1. (US, nautical) A tarpaulin.
    • 1938, Victor M. Linoff, Saddle and Western Gear Catalog, page 121,
      Plain white paulins, made of duck without seams. Furnished with snaps and rings or grommets.
    • 1956, L. K. Strouse, Interstate Commerce Commission Reports: Reports and Decisions of the Interstate Commerce Commission of the United States, Volume 294, page 114,
      The complainant's tents and paulins were manufactured and packed according to detailed specifications.
    • 2000, Richard Irving Dodge, Wayne R. Kime (editor), The Indian Territory Journals of Colonel Richard Irving Dodge, page 207,
      The sawmill was expected soon, and in the meantime fatigue details were erecting picket huts for temporary use — rows of raw logs stood on end in trenches forming rectangles, with roofs also of wood, covered by paulins and daubed with a layer of dirt.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.