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IdoEdit

NounEdit

populi

  1. plural of populo

LadinEdit

NounEdit

populi

  1. plural of popul

LatinEdit

NounEdit

populī

  1. nominative plural of populus
  2. genitive singular of populus
  3. vocative plural of populus

ReferencesEdit

  • populi in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • populi” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) the plague breaks out in the city: pestilentia (not pestis) in urbem (populum) invadit
    • (ambiguous) to write a history of Rome: res populi Romani perscribere
    • (ambiguous) to have an appreciative audience: populum facilem, aequum habere
    • (ambiguous) to address a meeting of the people: verba facere apud populum, in contione
    • (ambiguous) the dregs of the people: faex populi, plebis, civitatis
    • (ambiguous) to summon an assembly of the people: convocare populi concilium and populum ad concilium
    • (ambiguous) to propose a law in the popular assembly: legem ferre or simply ferre ad populum, ut...
    • (ambiguous) to formally propose a law to the people: legem rogare or rogare populum (cf. sect. XVI. 4, note Aulus Gellius...)
    • (ambiguous) popular favour; popularity: populi favor, gratia popularis
    • (ambiguous) to court popularity: gratiam populi quaerere
    • (ambiguous) public opinion: existimatio populi, hominum
    • (ambiguous) unpopularity: offensio populi, popularis
    • (ambiguous) unpopularity: offensa populi voluntas
    • (ambiguous) democracy: imperium populi or populare, civitas or res publica popularis
    • (ambiguous) to be a leading spirit of the popular cause: populi causam agere
    • (ambiguous) to enslave a free people: liberum populum servitute afficere
    • (ambiguous) to grant a people its independence: populum liberum esse, libertate uti, sui iuris esse pati
    • (ambiguous) the censors hold a census of the people: censores censent populum
    • (ambiguous) to appeal to the people: provocare ad populum (Liv. 2. 55)
    • (ambiguous) a matter is referred (for decision) from the senate to the people: a senatu res ad populum reicitur
    • (ambiguous) to be on friendly terms with the Roman people: in amicitia populi Romani esse (Liv. 22. 37)
    • (ambiguous) to reduce a country to subjection to oneself: populum in potestatem suam redigere (B. G. 2. 34)
    • (ambiguous) to reduce a country to subjection to oneself: populum in deditionem venire cogere
    • (ambiguous) to accept the submission of a people: populum in deditionem accipere
    • (ambiguous) to subjugate a nation: populum perdomare, subigere
    • (ambiguous) to make oneself master of a people, country: populum, terram suo imperio, suae potestati subicere (not sibi by itself)
    • (ambiguous) Asia was made subject to Rome: Asia populi Romani facta est
  • populi in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly