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Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman puignant; equivalent to poynen +‎ -ant.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpui̯nau̯nt/, /ˈpui̯nant/

AdjectiveEdit

poynaunt

  1. Sour or acidic to the taste.
    • c. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “General Prologue”, in The Canterbury Tales, lines 353-354:
      Wo was his cook, but if his ſauce were / Poynaunt and ſhaꝛp, and redy al his geere.
      Woe to his cook, except if his sauce was / sour and sharp, and all his equipment was ready.
  2. Stabbing; having a sharp, spiky point.
  3. Causing fright; upsetting, horrifying.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: poignant

ReferencesEdit