radiation

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin radiatio, radiationis. By surface analysis, radiate +‎ -ion.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɹeɪ.di.ˈeɪ.ʃən/
  • (file)
  • (some US dialects) IPA(key): /ɹaɪ.di.ˈaɪ.ʃən/
  • (some Ghanaian speakers) IPA(key): /ɹæ.di.ˈeɪ.ʃən/

NounEdit

radiation (countable and uncountable, plural radiations)

  1. The shooting forth of anything from a point or surface, like diverging rays of light.
    heat radiation
  2. The process of radiating waves or particles.
  3. The transfer of energy via radiation.
    Coordinate terms: convection, conduction
  4. Radioactive energy.
  5. (evolutionary theory, countable) A rapid diversification of an ancestral species into many new forms.
    • 2014, Elizabeth Kolbert, chapter 8, in The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History, Henry Holt and Company:
      So the question is: have plants and animals retained over this huge amount of time—whole radiations of mammals have come and gone in this period—have they retained these potentially costly characteristics?
    • 2016, Donald R. Prothero, The Princeton Field Guide to Prehistoric Mammals (page 136)
      The second [canid group] is the radiation of dogs in South America that began when the first canids arrived about 3 Ma, after crossing the Panama land bridge (Fig. 5.4).

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin radiatio, radiationem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

radiation f (plural radiations)

  1. radiation (all meanings)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Romanian: radiație
  • Turkish: radyasyon

Further readingEdit