redivivus

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin redivīvus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

redivivus (not comparable)

  1. (chiefly figuratively, postpositive) Living again; brought back to life.
    • 1912, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World[1]:
      "Professor Munchausen - how's that for an inset headline? Sir John Mandeville redivivus - Cagliostro - all the imposters and bullies in history."
    • 1979, André Brink, A Dry White Season, Vintage 1998, p. 43:
      A tall, athletic, tanned man, his smooth black hair slick with oil, long sideburns, neatly trimmed moustache, Clark Gable redivivus.

SynonymsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From red(i)- +‎ vīvus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

redivīvus (feminine redivīva, neuter redivīvum); first/second-declension adjective

  1. restored to life
  2. renewed, renovated
  3. secondhand

DeclensionEdit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative redivīvus redivīva redivīvum redivīvī redivīvae redivīva
Genitive redivīvī redivīvae redivīvī redivīvōrum redivīvārum redivīvōrum
Dative redivīvō redivīvō redivīvīs
Accusative redivīvum redivīvam redivīvum redivīvōs redivīvās redivīva
Ablative redivīvō redivīvā redivīvō redivīvīs
Vocative redivīve redivīva redivīvum redivīvī redivīvae redivīva

DescendantsEdit

  • Catalan: rediviu
  • English: redivivus
  • Galician: redivivo
  • Italian: redivivo
  • Portuguese: redivivo
  • Spanish: redivivo

ReferencesEdit