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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

sash +‎ -ed

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sashed (not comparable)

  1. Fitted with a sash (window opener).
    • 1868, Thomas Richmond, The local records of Stockton and the neighbourhood
      Seeing sashed windows in town, he got them into his own house.
    • 1924, Herman Melville, Billy Budd, London: Constable & Co., Chapter 18, [1]
      A skylight of moderate dimension was overhead and at each end of the oblong space were two sashed port-hole windows easily convertible back into embrasures for short carronades.
  2. Having a sash (cloth decoration).
    • 1971, Chinua Achebe, "Public Execution in Pictures" in Collected Poems, New York: Anchor, 2004, p. 53,
      [] Certainly / there was impressive swagger in that / ready, high-elbowed stance; belted / and sashed in threaded dragon teeth / they waited in self-imposed restraint— / fine ornament on power unassailable— / for their cue
    • 2000, Laurence Senelick, The Changing Room: Sex, Drag and Theatre
      [] and even middle-class matrons serving in the Sanitary Commission adopted an 'army costume' of loose trousers covered by a sashed kilt and kirtle.

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