EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sahtlen, which merged with set(t)len, as in the standard English form settle (which see).

VerbEdit

sattle (third-person singular simple present sattles, present participle sattling, simple past and past participle sattled)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) Alternative form of settle, especially in the senses of "silence; become or make calm or orderly; adjust differences or accounts; settle down".
    • 1829, William Oliver, A Collection of Original Local [Newcastle] Songs, Tim Tunbelly, page 16:
      He'll seun sattle obstropolous Billy — Nee mair he'll refuse for a way-leave to pay.
    • 1889, John Nicholson, The Folk Speech of East Yorkshire, page 35:
      Ah can sattle a dog and cat wivoot thah help.
    • 1870, Jabez Oliphant, quoted in The English Dialect Dictionary:
      Well, we'll sattle him, only how!

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

sattle

  1. First-person singular present of satteln.
  2. Imperative singular of satteln.
  3. First-person singular subjunctive I of satteln.
  4. Third-person singular subjunctive I of satteln.