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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

section +‎ -ary, calque of French sectionnaire.

NounEdit

sectionary (plural sectionaries)

  1. (historical) A member of a French antiroyalist political party that was one of the driving forces of the French Revolution.
    • 1835, Sydney Smith, The Edinburgh Review Or Critical Journal:
      The Sectionary must differ with him — he must refuse to go along with him, else he becomes a Ministerial man — he is no longer a Sectionary — he loses his separate existence — he is absorbed in the Treasury body.
    • 1856, M. Mignet, History of the French Revolution from 1789 to 1814, →ISBN:
      Every indigent citizen was allowed forty sous a day, to enable him to be present at the sectionary meetings.
    • 1973, ‎William Scott, Terror and repression in revolutionary Marseilles, page 256:
      Thus the Revolutionary Tribunal followed, in its treatment of the commissaires of Marseilles and Aix, and their allies, the principles which marked its treatment of sectionary officeholders.
  2. (historical) A member or supporter of the sectionary party.
    • 1838, Marie Joseph L. Adolphe Thiers, The history of the French revolution, translated. with notes by F. Shoberl, page 283:
      The sectionaries replied by a very brisk fire of musketry; but Bonaparte, covering them with grape-shot, obliged them to fall back upon the steps of St. Roch; then, debouching in the Rue St. Honore', he directed upon the church itself a band of patriots who were fighting at his side with the greatest valour, and who had cruel injuries to revenge.
    • 1835, Sydney Smith, The Edinburgh Review Or Critical Journal:
      The Sectionary must differ with him — he must refuse to go along with him, else he becomes a Ministerial man — he is no longer a Sectionary — he loses his separate existence — he is absorbed in the Treasury body.
    • 1897, Alexandre Dumas, Sylvandire. The woman with the velvet necklace, page 95:
      You take a good deal for granted, my young Prusssssian ," rejoined the sectionary, pronouncing the word with a prodigality of s's which attracted the attention of half a score of idlers to the traveller.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sectionary (not comparable)

  1. (historical) Pertaining to the sectionary party.
    • 1991, Malcolm Crook, Toulon in War and Revolution, →ISBN, page 126:
      Any explanation for the triumph of the 'federalist' or sectionary movement at Toulon must, therefore, begin by examining the profound isolation of the incumbent Jacobin administration.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit