shorewards

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

shore +‎ -wards

AdverbEdit

shorewards (not comparable)

  1. towards the shore
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet[1]:
      Then it all came back, and I was a boy again on the trawler, creeping shorewards in the light breeze of an August night, and watching that friendly twinkle from the Manor woods above the village.
    • 1899, Mrs. Cashel Hoey, An Antarctic Mystery[2]:
      The men rowed shorewards, but were stopped by four canoes carrying armed men, "new men" the narrative calls them.