structural

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

19th century; structure +‎ -al

AdjectiveEdit

structural (not comparable)

  1. Of, relating to, or having structure.
    • 1814, Thomas Young, “An Introduction to Medical Literature, including a System of practical Nosology”, in The Monthly Review, page 185:
      Class 1. consists of nervous diseases, such as depend on the nervous and muscular systems; the second, of sanguine diseases, such as depend on the sanguiferous system; the third, of secretory diseases, or such as are connected with the state of the secretions; and the fourth, of structural diseases, or those that are connected with the nutritive powers.
  2. Involving the mechanics of construction.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

structural (plural structurals)

  1. Structural steel, used in construction.
    • 1982, United States International Trade Commission, Certain carbon steel products from Spain (page A-49)
      Freight differentials often increased the spread in favor of the imported structurals. Purchasers repeatedly emphasized that their purchases of imported structurals were split among a number of sources, including Spain, France, West Germany, []

Further readingEdit

  • "structural" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 301.

FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

structural (feminine singular structurale, masculine plural structuraux, feminine plural structurales)

  1. structural

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French structural.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

structural m or n (feminine singular structurală, masculine plural structurali, feminine and neuter plural structurale)

  1. structural

DeclensionEdit