testaceous

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin testāceus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

testaceous (comparative more testaceous, superlative most testaceous)

  1. (obsolete) Pertaining to earthenware or baked clay.
    • 1658, Thomas Browne, Urne-Burial, Penguin 2005, p. 20:
      [T]hey were burnt, or only baked in Oven or Sunne: According to the ancient way, in many bricks, tiles, pots, and testaceous works […].
  2. Having a shell, especially one which is not articulated.
    • 1665, Robert Hooke, Micrographia, XLIII:
      It has a very large head, in proportion to its body, all covered with a shell, like other testaceous Animals […].
    • 1740, John Dyer, “The Ruins of Rome. A Poem.”, in Poems. [...] Viz. I. Grongar Hill. II. The Ruins of Rome. III. The Fleece, in Four Books, London: Printed by John Hughs, for Messrs. R[obert] and J[ames] Dodsley, [], published 1759, OCLC 991281870, pages 42–43:
      Tyrian garbs, / Neptunian Albion's high teſtaceous food [i.e., oysters], / And flavour'd Chian wines with incenſe fum'd / To ſlake Patrician thirſt: for theſe, their rights / In the vile ſtreets they proſtitute to ſale; / Their ancient rights, their dignities, their laws, / Their native glorious freedom.
  3. Of a dull orange or brownish colour, like brick.