Open main menu
See also: Tilbury

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Tilbury (surname of the inventor).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈtɪlbəɹi/
  • (file)

NounEdit

tilbury (plural tilburies)

  1. (historical) A small open two-wheeled carriage.
    • 1829, Augustus Bozzi Granville, St. Petersburgh, a journal of travels to and from that capital:
      Of late years, cabriolets, and English stanhopes, and tilburys, have been introduced into St. Petersburgh; but the real national carriage for the town is the Droshky.
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, chapter 16, in Vanity Fair:
      If she was jocular, he used to revolve her jokes in his mind, and explode over them half an hour afterwards in the street, to the surprise of the groom in the tilbury []
  2. (slang, obsolete) Sixpence (formerly the fare from Gravesend to Tilbury Fort).

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English tilbury.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tilbury m (plural tilburys)

  1. (historical) tilbury

Further readingEdit