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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

un- +‎ doubting

AdjectiveEdit

undoubting (not comparable)

  1. (of persons, states of mind, beliefs, etc.) Experiencing or harboring no doubts; entirely confident.
    • 1665, George Wither, Meditations on the Lord's Prayer, London, page 75:
      And we shall have an undoubting assurance that that this Kingdom is in such a measure within us, as will ripen to perfection in due time.
    • 1787, Jonathan Edwards, Treatise concerning the religious affections, New York, N.Y.: Robert Hodge, page 196:
      And God's declared design in all this is, that the heirs of the promises might have an undoubting hope.
    • 1814 July, [Jane Austen], chapter IV, in Mansfield Park: A Novel. In Three Volumes, volume II, London: Printed for T[homas] Egerton, [], OCLC 39810224, page 88:
      With undoubting decision she directly began her adieus; []
    • 1919, Virginia Woolf, chapter XXIV, in Night and Day:
      It was the part of a gentleman to preserve a bearing that was, as far as he could make it, the bearing of an undoubting lover.
    • 2002 October 6, Mike Greenberg, “Guest, symphony an adept team”, in San Antonio Express-News, page 8B:
      This overstuffed, smug, showy and sentimental music can almost persuade when it is performed with undoubting conviction.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • undoubting in An American Dictionary of the English Language, by Noah Webster, 1828.
  • Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., 1989.
  • Random House Webster's Unabridged Electronic Dictionary, 1987-1996.