Latin

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Etymology

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From unguō (I smear, I anoint) +‎ -entus. Compare ōmentum.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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unguentum n (genitive unguentī); second declension

  1. ointment; perfume; unguent.
    • c. 84 BCE – 54 BCE, Catullus, Carmen 13 11-14:
      nam unguentum dabo, quod meae puellae,
      donarunt Veneres Cupidinesque,
      quod tu cum olfacies, deos rogabis,
      totum ut te faciant, Fabulle, nasum.
      for I will give you perfume, which to my girl
      Venuses and Cupids have given,
      which when you smell it, you will ask the gods,
      to make you, Fabullus, all nose

Declension

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Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative unguentum unguenta
Genitive unguentī unguentōrum
Dative unguentō unguentīs
Accusative unguentum unguenta
Ablative unguentō unguentīs
Vocative unguentum unguenta
  • In Plautus, the genitive plural is found as unguentum rather than unguentōrum.

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • English: unguent
  • French: onguent
  • Galician: ungüento, ingüento (semi-learned)
  • Italian: unguento
  • Spanish: ungüento

References

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  • unguentum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • unguentum”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • unguentum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • unguentum”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • unguentum”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890), A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin