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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

un- +‎ illustrious

AdjectiveEdit

unillustrious (comparative more unillustrious, superlative most unillustrious)

  1. Not illustrious.
    • 1892, Various, Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 103, Sep. 24, 1892[1]:
      The "Metropolitans" followed the example of many unillustrious predecessors, though it must, in justice, be added, that they would have been shocked to hear anyone impute to them a want of originality in their curious methods.
    • 1915, Richard Le Gallienne, Vanishing Roads and Other Essays[2]:
      One has known actors, far from unillustrious, who staked their whole performance on some such learned triviality or some trifling novelty of business, when, for example, in Hamlet's scene with his mother, the prince comes to: Look here upon this picture, and on this.

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