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wieldsome

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

wield +‎ -some

AdjectiveEdit

wieldsome (comparative more wieldsome, superlative most wieldsome)

  1. Characterised or marked by wieldiness; easily wielded or managed.
    • 1565, Arthur Golding (translator), The eyght bookes of Caius Iulius Cæsar conteyning his martiall exploytes in the realme of Gallia, London: William Seres, Book Four, p. 99b,[1]
      [] Cesar [] commaunded that the Galleyes wherof the facion was more straunge to the sauage Britons, and the mouing more redy and wieldsome, should be remoued a lyttell from the shyps of Burthen []
    • 1902, The State of Corrections: Proceedings, ACA Annual Conferences:
      The wieldsome agencies are, again, two-fold. Those that are authorative and of the government, mandatory; the others in part or altogether voluntary are more directory than mandatory.

Derived termsEdit