See also: some

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English -som, -sum, from Old English -sum (same as; -some), from Proto-Germanic *-samaz, from Proto-Germanic *samaz (same). Akin to Saterland Frisian -soam (-some), West Frisian -sum (-some), Dutch -zaam (-some), German Low German -saam (-some), German -sam (-some), Danish -som, Swedish -sam, Icelandic -samur (-some), Gothic -𐍃𐌰𐌼𐍃 (-sams), -𐍃𐌰𐌼𐌰 (-sama). Cognate with Albanian -shëm (-some). More at same.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-some

  1. (forms adjectives from nouns or adjectives) Characterized by some specific condition or quality, usually to a considerable degree.
    • 2012, Tom Sandham, World's Best Cocktails:
      Elsewhere the blingsome silver-beveled mirrors, butterfly and lotus blossom motifs, and the occasional chaise longue make the opulence a touch on the show-off side for me, but the expenses were obviously 5-star and it's undoubtedly bespoke.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English -som, from a specialized use of Old English sum (some, one) coming after a genitive plural (e.g. hē wæs fēowertiga sum --"he was one of forty", literally "he was forties' some[one]"; sixa sum --"one of six, sixsome").

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-some

  1. (forms nouns from numerals) Denoting a group with a certain small number of members.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Ancient Greek σῶμα (sôma, body).

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-some

  1. (noun combining form) Body.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From previous sense “body” (from Ancient Greek σῶμα (sôma, body)), by analogy with chromosome.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-some

  1. (noun combining form) Chromosome.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

From some in its "approximately" sense; more at some § Etymology.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-some

  1. Plus some indeterminate fraction not amounting to the next higher round number or significant digit; and change; -odd.
    twenty-some identifiable factors affecting the outcome
    one-hundred-and-fifty-some spectators in the bleachers

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English -som, -sum, from Old English -sum (same as; -some), from Proto-Germanic *-samaz, from Proto-Germanic *samaz (same).

SuffixEdit

-some

  1. (forms adjectives from nouns or adjectives) With nouns and verbs in an active and passive sense, implying “inclined to, full of, causing or caused by”.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English -som, from a specialized use of Old English sum (some, one) coming after a genitive plural.

SuffixEdit

-some

  1. (forms nouns from numerals) As a suffix after cardinal numbers to denote a group, company, team, etc. of that number together or thought of as a unit.

ReferencesEdit