EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

yarrum (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) Milk.
    • 1652, Brome, Richard, A Joviall Crew: or, the Merry Beggars, play, first performed 1641:
      Here's Pannum and Lap, and good Poplars of Yarrum, / To fill up the Crib, and to comfort the Quarron.
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:yarrum.

ReferencesEdit

  • OED2
  • [Francis Grose] (1788), “Yarrum”, in A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 2nd corrected and enlarged edition, London: Printed for S. Hooper, [], OCLC 3138643.
  • [Francis] Grose [et al.] (1811), “Yarrum”, in Lexicon Balatronicum. A Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence. [], London: Printed for C. Chappell, [], OCLC 23927885.
  • “yarum” in Albert Barrère and Charles G[odfrey] Leland, compilers and editors, A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant, volume II (L–Z), Edinburgh: The Ballantyne Press, 1889–1890, page 424.
  • Farmer, John Stephen (1904) Slang and Its Analogues[1], volume 7, page 372

AnagramsEdit