Last modified on 13 March 2015, at 22:59

γυμνός

Ancient GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From *gʷomnós by Cowgill's Law (o → u between labial and resonant), from Proto-Indo-European *nogʷmós by metathesis (possible taboo deformation), from Proto-Indo-European *nogʷó-. Cognates include Latin nūdus, Old Armenian մերկ (merk), Sanskrit नग्न (nagna), Hindi नंगा (naṅgā), Avestan 𐬨𐬀𐬕𐬥𐬀 (maġna), Old Church Slavonic нагъ (nagŭ), Lithuanian nuogas, Old Irish nocht, and Old English nacod (English naked).


PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

γυμνός (gumnósm, γυμνή f, γυμνόν n; first/second declension

  1. naked, unclad
  2. unarmed, without armor, defenseless
  3. bare, uncovered
  4. stripped, destitute
  5. lightly clad
  6. mere

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • LSJ
  • BDAG
  • G1131 in Strong's Exhaustive Concordance to the Bible.
  • American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots. Ed. Calvert Watkins. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1985.
  • Huld, Martin E. “Magic, Metathesis and Nudity in Indo-European Thought.” Ancient Languages and Philology. Vol 1 of Studies in Honor of Jaan Puhvel. Eds.

Dorothy Disterheft et al. Journal of Indo-European Studies Monograph 20. Gen. eds. A. Richard Diebold and Edgar C. Polomé. Washington: Institute for the Study of Man, 1997. 75-92.


GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek γυμνός (gumnós), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *nogʷó-.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

γυμνός (gymnósm,  feminine: γυμνόςηή (gymnósií), neuter: γυμνός (gymnós)

  1. naked, unsheathed, bare.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

see: γυμνάζω (gymnázo, to train, to exercise)