acquaintance

EnglishEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French acointance. Compare French accointance.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

acquaintance (plural acquaintances)

  1. (uncountable) A state of being acquainted, or of having intimate, or more than slight or superficial, knowledge; personal knowledge gained by intercourse short of that of friendship or intimacy
    I know of the man; but have no acquaintance with him.
    • 1799, William Jones (translator), Hito'pade'sa, in The Works, Volume 6, page 22:
      Contract no friendſhip, or even acquaintance, with a guileful man : he reſembles a coal, which when hot burneth the hand, and when cold blacketh it.
  2. (countable) A person or persons with whom one is acquainted.

Usage notesEdit

  • Synonym notes: The words acquaintance, familiarity, and intimacy mark different degrees of closeness in social intercourse. Acquaintance arises from occasional intercourse; as, our acquaintance has been a brief one. We can speak of a slight or an intimate acquaintance. Familiarity is the result of continued acquaintance. It springs from persons being frequently together, so as to wear off all restraint and reserve; as, the familiarity of old companions. Intimacy is the result of close connection, and the freest interchange of thought; as, the intimacy of established friendship.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Last modified on 6 April 2014, at 05:46