Last modified on 8 December 2014, at 02:14

relation

See also: Relation

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman relacioun, from Old French relacion (cognate to French relation), from Latin relationem, accusative of relatio, noun of process form from perfect passive participle relatus (related), from verb referre (to refer, to relate), from prefix re- (again) + ferre (to bear, to carry)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

relation (plural relations)

  1. The manner in which two things may be associated.
    The relation between diet and health is complex.
  2. A member of one's family.
    Yes, he's a relation of mine, but a only distant one.
  3. The act of relating a story.
    Your relation of the events is different from mine.
  4. (set theory) A set of ordered tuples.
    • 1974, Thomas S. Szasz, M.D., chapter 7, The Myth of Mental Illness[1], ISBN 0-06-091151-4, page 107:
      [...] Signs are, first of all, physical things: for example, chalk
      marks on a blackboard, pencil or ink marks on paper, sound
      waves produced in a human throat. According to Reichen-
      bach, "What makes them signs is the intermediary position
      they occupy between an object and a sign user, i.e., a per-
      son."1 For a sign to be a sign, or to function as such, it is
      necessary that the person take account of the object it desig-
      nates. Thus, anything in nature may or may not be a sign,
      depending on a person's attitude toward it. A physical thing is
      a sign when it appears as a substitute for, or representation of,
      the object for which it stands with respect to the sign user. The
      three-place relation between sign, object, and sign user is
      called the sign relation or relation of denotation.
  5. (set theory) Specifically, a set of ordered pairs.
    Equality is a symmetric relation, while divisibility is not.
  6. (databases) A set of ordered tuples retrievable by a relational database; a table.
    This relation uses the customer's social security number as a key.
  7. (mathematics) A statement of equality of two products of generators, used in the presentation of a group.
  8. (usually collocated: sexual relations) The act of intercourse

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TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin relatio.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

relation f (plural relations)

  1. relation
  2. relationship

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External linksEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

relation c

  1. relation; how two things may be associated
  2. (mathematics) relation; set of ordered tuples
  3. (computing) relation; retrievable by a database

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit