Last modified on 4 December 2014, at 09:37

addiction

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From addict +‎ -ion; compare (Latin) addictio (an adjudging, an award)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

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Wikipedia

addiction (plural addictions)

  1. (medicine) A state that is characterized by compulsive drug use or compulsive engagement in rewarding behavior, despite negative consequences.[1][2]
  2. The state of being addicted; devotion; inclination.
  3. A habit or practice that damages, jeopardizes or shortens one's life but when ceased causes trauma.
  4. A pathological relationship to mood altering experience that has life damaging consequences.
    His addiction was to courses vain. Shakespeare.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Angres DH, Bettinardi-Angres K (October 2008). "The disease of addiction: origins, treatment, and recovery". Dis Mon 54 (10): 696–721. doi:10.1016/j.disamonth.2008.07.002. PMID 18790142.
  2. ^ Malenka RC, Nestler EJ, Hyman SE (2009). "Chapter 15: Reinforcement and Addictive Disorders". In Sydor A, Brown RY. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundation for Clinical Neuroscience (2nd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill Medical. pp. 364–365, 375. ISBN 9780071481274. "The defining feature of addiction is compulsive, out-of-control drug use, despite negative consequences. ...compulsive eating, shopping, gambling, and sex–so-called “natural addictions”– Indeed, addiction to both drugs and behavioral rewards may arise from similar dysregulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system."

TranslationsEdit

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JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English addiction.

NounEdit

addiction f (plural addictions)

  1. addiction