Last modified on 21 October 2014, at 20:16

admiration

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French admiration < Latin admīrātiō, from prefix ad- + mīrō (I look at) + -ātiō. Compare the verb admire.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

admiration (plural admirations)

  1. Wonder mingled with approbation or delight; an emotion excited by a person or thing possessed of wonderful or high excellence; as, admiration of a beautiful woman, of a landscape, of virtue.
  2. (obsolete) Wonder or questioning, without any particular positive or negative attitude to the subject.
    • Lear: Your name, faire Gentlewoman?
      Gonerill: This admiration Sir, is much o'th' savour
      Of other your new prankes.
      William Shakespeare, King Lear, I.ii.
  3. (obsolete) Cause of admiration; something to excite wonder, or pleased surprise.
    • Shakespeare
      Now, good Lafeu, bring in the admiration.

SynonymsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin admiratio, admirationem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

admiration f (plural admirations)

  1. admiration
    Plein d’admiration pour son adversaire, chacun lève sa propre visière : "Elsseneur ! ...", "Réginald ! ..." (Les Chants de Maldoror - Chant V) - Full of admiration for his enemy, ...

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