Last modified on 2 June 2014, at 18:58

apophatic

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἀποϕατικός (apoϕatikós, negative).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

apophatic (comparative more apophatic, superlative most apophatic)

  1. Pertaining to knowledge of God obtained through negation rather than positive assertions.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 488:
      For him, the assertions of Palamas ran counter to the apophatic insistence in Pseudo-Dionysius that God was unknowable in his essence.
    • 2009, Karen Armstrong, The Case for God, Vintage 2010, p. 123:
      Augustine had absorbed the underlying spirit of Greek apophatic theology, but the West did not develop a fully fledged spirituality of silence until the ninth century, when the writings of an unknown Greek author were translated into Latin and achieved near-canonical status in Europe.

AntonymsEdit