aquabib

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Based on Latin aqua (water) + bibere, infinitive of bibō (to drink)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aquabib (plural aquabibs)

  1. (very rare, obsolete, derogatory) A teetotaler; one who does not consume alcohol.
    • 1883, The Louisville Medical News: a weekly journal of medicine and surgery: Volumes 15-16:
      and aquabibs are epithets bestowed by the champions of alcohol in London upon the temperance folk.
    • 1949, Julia Cooley Altrocchi, The spectacular San Franciscans:
      Dwight L. Moody and John B. Gough, the great aquabib, had commanded attention []
    • 1966, Robert Arnold Aubin, Topographical poetry in XVII-century Eng:
      While its more sober counterpart was directed to quite different ends by a pugnacious aquabib, William Henry Draper

Usage notesEdit

  • Proposed circa 1883 as a slur for members of the temperance movement, who would not drink alcohol.
Last modified on 26 August 2013, at 16:40