Last modified on 26 May 2014, at 19:25

bedoven

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old English bedofen, past particle of Old English bedūfan (to bedive, to put under, immerse, submerge, drown), equivalent to be- +‎ dive. Cognate with Middle Low German bedöven (immersed).

AdjectiveEdit

bedoven (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) drenched.
    Alle hir body..semyd be dowen in blood — Life of Saint Christina Mirabilis of Saint Trudons (All her body seemed bedoven in blood.)
    The wind made wave the red weed on the dike. Bedoven in dank deep was every sike. — A Scotch Winter Evening in I512
  2. (obsolete) drowned.