charivari

EnglishEdit

The cover of the first issue (1841) of the British satirical magazine Punch, or the London Charivari

EtymologyEdit

From French charivari.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

charivari (countable and uncountable, plural charivaris)

  1. The noisy banging of pots and pans as a mock serenade to a newly married couple, or similar occasion.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 94:
      The marriage ceremony was given primordial significance over folkloric pre-marriage engagement rituals and wild charvaris.
  2. Any loud, cacophonous noise or hubbub.

Related termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps Latin caribaria, from carivaria, perhaps from Ancient Greek καρηβάρεια (karēbareia, headache).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

charivari m (plural charivaris)

  1. charivari, shivaree, mock serenade of discordant noise, notably to heckle a publicly reviled figure
  2. A racket, banging in general, rumpus
Last modified on 31 March 2014, at 17:19