Last modified on 22 August 2014, at 19:37
See also: pōt, pǫt, pot-, and pót-

EnglishEdit

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Cooking pot on a stove.

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English pot, potte, from Old English pott (a pot), from Proto-Germanic *puttaz (pot), from Proto-Indo-European *budn- (a type of vessel). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Pot (pot), Dutch pot (pot), Low German Pott (pot), German Pott (pot), Swedish pott (pot), Icelandic pottur (tub, pot).

NounEdit

pot (plural pots)

  1. A vessel used for cooking or storing food, or for growing plants in, especially flowers.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 10, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      He looked round the poor room, at the distempered walls, and the bad engravings in meretricious frames, the crinkly paper and wax flowers on the chiffonier; and he thought of a room like Father Bryan's, with panelling, with cut glass, with tulips in silver pots, such a room as he had hoped to have for his own.
  2. (poker) The money wagered in poker or similar games.
  3. A trap for catching lobsters, crabs, eels, or fish.
  4. (archaic) An iron hat with a broad brim.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 12:
      The pot is an iron hat with broad brims: there are many under the denomination in the Tower, said to have been taken from the French; one of them is represented in plat 7, fig. 1 and 2.
  5. (Australia, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania) A glass of beer, of a size that varies regionally but is normally 10 fl oz (285 ml).
    • 2009, Deborah Penrith, Jodie Seal, Live & Work in Australia, page 187,
      There are plenty of pubs and bars all over Australia (serving beer in schooners – 425ml or middies/pots ~285ml), and if you don′t fancy those you can drink in wine bars, pleasant beer gardens, or with friends at home.
  6. A potshot.
    • 2011 October 1, Tom Fordyce, “Rugby World Cup 2011: England 16-12 Scotland”, BBC Sport:
      England were shipping penalties at an alarming rate - five in the first 15 minutes alone - and with Wilkinson missing three long-distance pots of his own in the first 20 minutes, the alarm bells began to ring for Martin Johnson's men.
  7. (slang) A protruding belly; a paunch.
  8. (slang) Ruin or deterioration.
    His prospects went to pot.
  9. (sports, billiards, snooker, pool) The act of causing a ball to fall into a pocket.
  10. (slang) A potentiometer.
  11. (rail transport) A non-conducting, usually ceramic, stand that supports the third rail while keeping it electrically insulated from the ground.
  12. (obsolete) An earthen or pewter cup for liquors; a mug.
  13. A metal or earthenware extension of a flue above the top of a chimney; a chimney pot.
  14. A crucible.
    a graphite pot; a melting pot
  15. A perforated cask for draining sugar.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  16. A size of paper; pott.
  17. (slang) toilet
    • 2011, Ben Zeller, Secrets of Beaver Creek (page 204)
      “Clinton,” Gail cried from outside, “are you going to sit on the pot all day?”
SynonymsEdit
  • (cooking vessel):
  • (money wagered in a card game):
  • (trap for crustaceans or fish):
  • (285ml glass of beer): middy (New South Wales, Western Australia), schooner (South Australia)
  • (potshot):
  • (protruding belly): beer belly
  • (ruin, deterioration):
  • (in English billiards): winning hazard
  • (potentiometer):
  • (non-conducting stand for a third rail):
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pot (third-person singular simple present pots, present participle potting, simple past and past participle potted)

  1. To put (something) into a pot.
    to pot a plant
  2. To preserve by bottling or canning.
    potted meat
  3. (cue sports) To cause a ball to fall into a pocket.
  4. (cue sports) To be capable of being potted.
    The black ball doesn't pot; the red is in the way.
  5. To shoot.
  6. (UK) To send someone to gaol, expeditiously.
  7. (obsolete, dialect, UK) To tipple; to drink.
    • Feltham
      It is less labour to plough than to pot it.
  8. (transitive) To drain.
    to pot sugar, by taking it from the cooler, and placing it in hogsheads, etc. with perforated heads, through which the molasses drains off
    (Can we find and add a quotation of B. Edwards to this entry?)
  9. (UK, transitive) To seat a person, usually a young child, onto a potty or toilet, typically during toilet teaching.
    Could you please pot the children before sending them to bed?
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly a shortened form of Mexican Spanish potiguaya (marijuana leaves) or potaguaya (cannabis leaves) or potación de guaya literally ‘drink of grief’, supposedly denoting a drink of wine or brandy in which marijuana buds were steeped.

NounEdit

pot (uncountable)

  1. (slang, uncountable) The drug marijuana.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Clipping of potentiometer.

NounEdit

pot (plural pots)

  1. (slang, electronics) A simple electromechanical device used to control resistance or voltage (often to adjust sound volume) in an electronic device by rotating or sliding when manipulated by a human thumb, screwdriver, etc.
Derived termsEdit
  1. slide pot, a sliding (linear) potentiometer typically designed to be manipulated by a thumb or finger
  2. thumb pot, a rotating potentiometer designed to be turned by a thumb or finger

ReferencesEdit

  • “pot” in the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, 1974 edition.
  • pot” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch pot.

NounEdit

pot (plural potte)

  1. pot; jar

AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Romance *pottus ‘pot’

NounEdit

pot m (indefinite plural pota, definite singular poti, definite plural potat)

  1. mill-hopper, flower-bin
  2. little boy
Related termsEdit

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a Vulgar Latin *poteō, from Latin possum (formed analogically in post-Classical Latin on the basis of potens, the present participle of possum). Compare Daco-Romanian putea, pot.

VerbEdit

pot (third-person singular present indicative poati/poate, past participle pututã)

  1. I can, could, am able to.

Related termsEdit


BasqueEdit

NounEdit

pot

  1. kiss

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

pot

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of poder

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pot m, inanimate

  1. sweat

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pot m (plural potten, diminutive potje n)

  1. jar, pot
  2. (Belgium) cooking pot
  3. (pejorative) dyke (lesbian)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

pot

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of potten
  2. imperative of potten

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French pot, from Old French pot (pot), from Vulgar Latin pottum, pottus (pot, jar), from Proto-Germanic *puttaz (pot, jar, tub), from Proto-Indo-European *budn- (a kind of vessel). More at pot.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pot m (plural pots)

  1. (common, original sense) pot, jar, vase (often specified after its intended content which follows after à -, e.g. pot à épices 'spice jar')
  2. cooking pot; (culinary) dish
  3. (colloquial) drink, jar, bevvy
  4. (colloquial) do (UK), bash, drinks party
  5. pot, kitty, pool (of money staked at cards etc.)
  6. ancient measure, containing two pintes
  7. paper size, about 40 by 31 cm
  8. (slang, vulgar) arse, bum, backside

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition

External linksEdit


JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French pot (pot), from Vulgar Latin pottum, pottus (pot, jar), from Proto-Germanic *puttaz (pot, jar, tub), from Proto-Indo-European *budn- (a kind of vessel).

NounEdit

pot m (plural pots)

  1. pot

Derived termsEdit


LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

pot

  1. rafsi of porto.

Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

pot

  1. third-person singular present indicative of poeir

PolishEdit

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *potъ

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pot m

  1. sweat

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pot

  1. first-person singular present tense form of putea.
    te pot vedea, prostule.
    I can see you, idiot.
  2. first-person singular subjunctive form of putea.
    am să pot merg cu tine mâine dimineață
    I'll be able to go with you tomorrow morning.
  3. third-person plural present tense form of putea.
    calmează-te, nu pot -ți străbată gândul.
    calm down, they can't read your mind.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *potъ.

NounEdit

pȍt m (Cyrillic spelling пот)

  1. sweat

SynonymsEdit


SloveneEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *pǫtь.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pót f (genitive potí, nominative plural potí)

  1. way, road
DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Slavic *potъ.

NounEdit

pót m inan (genitive potú or póta, uncountable)

  1. sweat
DeclensionEdit

TatarEdit

NounEdit

pot

  1. (archaic) A unit of volume: 1 pot, the volume of 16 kg of water.
  2. (archaic) A unit of weight: 1 pot = 40 qadaq = 16.380 kg .

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit