Last modified on 15 December 2014, at 21:19

chore

See also: -chore, chóre, and Chöre

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English cherre (odd job, turn, occasion, business), from Old English ċerr, ċierr (a turn), from ċierran (to turn), from Proto-Germanic *karzijaną (to turn), from Proto-Indo-European *gers- (to bend, turn). Cognate with Old Saxon kērian, Old High German chēran (German kehren (to turn)). See also char.

NounEdit

chore (plural chores)

  1. A task, especially a difficult, unpleasant, or routine one.
    Washing dishes is a chore, but we cannot just stop eating.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

chore (third-person singular simple present chores, present participle choring, simple past and past participle chored)

  1. (US, dated) To do chores.
ReferencesEdit
  • chore” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly derived from the Romani word chōr (thief), see also Geordie word chor.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

chore (third-person singular simple present chores, present participle chorring, simple past and past participle chorred)

  1. (UK, informal) To steal.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

chore (plural chores)

  1. (obsolete) A choir or chorus.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

chore

  1. vocative singular of chorus

Lower SorbianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

chore

  1. obsolete spelling of chóre

PolishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

chore

  1. nominative and accusative neuter singular of chory
  2. nominative and accusative masculine (non-personal) and feminine and neuter plural of chory

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

chore

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of chorar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of chorar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of chorar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of chorar