cicerone

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Italian cicerone, from Latin Cicero, the Roman orator.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /t͡ʃɪt͡ʃəˈɹəʊni/, /sɪsəˈɹəʊni/

NounEdit

cicerone (plural ciceroni)

  1. A guide who shows people around tourist sights.
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p. 3:
      he was in the act of making his evening plans with the same smelly but nice cicerone in a café-au-lait suit whom he had hired already twice at the same Genoese hotel [...].
    • 1987, Michael Brodsky, Xman, p. 360:
      Ultimately their gazes all rested on his cicerone as most powerful member of the group.
    • 2006, Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day, Vintage 2007, p. 279:
      “First,” advised their cicerone in the matter, Professor Svegli of the University of Pisa, “try to forget the usual picture in two dimensions.”

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

cicerone m (plural ciceroni)

  1. A guide who shows people around tourist sights.
  2. (informal) A know-it-all or smart ass.

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian cicerone, after Roman orator Marcus Tullius Cicero.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cicerone m f (plural cicerones)

  1. cicerone (guide who shows people tourist sights)

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 12 March 2014, at 21:00