Last modified on 21 September 2014, at 10:00

cicerone

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

1726,[1] from Italian cicerone (surface analysis cicero + -one (( augmentative))), from Latin Cicerōnem, form of Cicerō, agnomen of Marcus Tullius Cicero), the Roman orator, from cicer (chickpea), a reference to his warts, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱiker- (pea). Possibly humorous reference to loquaciousness of guides.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /t͡ʃɪt͡ʃəˈɹəʊni/, /sɪsəˈɹəʊni/

NounEdit

cicerone (plural ciceroni)

  1. A guide who shows people around tourist sights.
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p. 3:
      he was in the act of making his evening plans with the same smelly but nice cicerone in a café-au-lait suit whom he had hired already twice at the same Genoese hotel [...].
    • 1987, Michael Brodsky, Xman, p. 360:
      Ultimately their gazes all rested on his cicerone as most powerful member of the group.
    • 2006, Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day, Vintage 2007, p. 279:
      “First,” advised their cicerone in the matter, Professor Svegli of the University of Pisa, “try to forget the usual picture in two dimensions.”

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 cicerone” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Cicerōnem, form of Cicerō, agnomen of Marcus Tullius Cicero), the Roman orator, from cicer (chickpea), a reference to his warts, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱiker- (pea). Surface analysis cicero +‎ -one (( augmentative)).

NounEdit

cicerone m (plural ciceroni)

  1. A guide who shows people around tourist sights.
  2. (informal) A know-it-all or smart ass.

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian cicerone, after Roman orator Marcus Tullius Cicero.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cicerone m f (plural cicerones)

  1. cicerone (guide who shows people tourist sights)

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

cicerone m, f (plural cicerones)

  1. guide, cicerone

SynonymsEdit