Last modified on 7 July 2014, at 13:44

colloquium

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin colloquium.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kəˈləʊkwiːəm/, enPR: kə-lōʹkwē-əm

NounEdit

colloquium (plural colloquiums or colloquia)

  1. A colloquy; a meeting for discussion.
  2. An academic meeting or seminar usually led by a different lecturer and on a different topic at each meeting.
  3. An address to an academic meeting or seminar.
  4. (law) That part of the complaint or declaration in an action for defamation which shows that the words complained of were spoken concerning the plaintiff.

Usage notesEdit

Note that while colloquial refers specifically to informal conversation, colloquy and colloquium refer instead to formal conversation.

QuotationsEdit

  • 1876: Stephen Dowell, A History of Taxation and Taxes in England, I. 87.
    Writs were issued to London and the other towns principally concerned, directing the mayor and sheriffs to send to a colloquium at York two or three citizens with full power to treat on behalf of the community of the town.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • colloquium in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

colloquium n (genitive colloquiī); second declension

  1. conversation
  2. discussion
  3. interview
  4. conference
  5. parley

InflectionEdit

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative colloquium colloquia
genitive colloquiī colloquiōrum
dative colloquiō colloquiīs
accusative colloquium colloquia
ablative colloquiō colloquiīs
vocative colloquium colloquia

DescendantsEdit